June 12, 2014

What is the right speed to burn a DVD?

This is a question I have been asking myself for a  long time. I was always advised to burn DVDs/CDs at slow speeds. I was happy to oblige but I wasn’t sure why. Then one day I had a huge amount of data to be burned on to several disks. Naturally the slow speeds got on my nerves and I cranked up to higher speeds. Though I finished my work early, three disks were ruined. So I went online and did some research – and got to the bottom of it.

The data burning process…

Different burn speeds have different effects on  the signals used to burn any disk. A part of this depends on the quality of the disk and the writer. The process of physically burning data to any disk is analogue. Using higher speeds to burn any disk will not introduce errors, what really happens is this:
Every CD burner creates “bumps” on a CD’s surface. These bumps are detected by CD players in order to play. They are affected by the writing speed, disk quality and the laser.Thus it goes without saying that that they must be well defined. Poorly defined bumps result in the CD player extracting jittery signals. Thus the player is unable to decode data properly. The better the quality of a player, the lesser are its chances of making errors.

Final words…

Everywhere I searched, people recommended limiting speeds between 4x-8x. Of course, they also mentioned the quality of the disk and burner must also be noted.
Now matching speeds with the quality of the media is necessary; but we don’t get to figure this out at home unless we have a fully equipped lab. It is thus wiser to burn at lower speeds to be on the safe side. Of course, you might come across those days when there’s a lot of work and you simply cannot wait too long. For those instances use your judgment. Increase the speed if you have to but don't exceed the limit (usually printed on the CD). Instead stay a few notches below it.
If it is a data disk that you are burning, then higher speeds do not affect much as they are better protected (again, don’t cross the limit). Audio disks require you to keep the speeds low, so that you don’t lose out on quality.

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I will be moving this blog to a different address soon. Some of the content here is just too stupid so I'm going to change things around.
I'll keep the most read posts (the Fifa Controller fix) and redirect/post the new address.
14-6-2015


UPDATE 18-6-2015: New address http://debanu.blogspot.com

I'm having trouble moving the comments but that's thanks to Google updating its security and Disqus lagging behind. Sorry guys.

June 12, 2014

What is the right speed to burn a DVD?

This is a question I have been asking myself for a  long time. I was always advised to burn DVDs/CDs at slow speeds. I was happy to oblige but I wasn’t sure why. Then one day I had a huge amount of data to be burned on to several disks. Naturally the slow speeds got on my nerves and I cranked up to higher speeds. Though I finished my work early, three disks were ruined. So I went online and did some research – and got to the bottom of it.

The data burning process…

Different burn speeds have different effects on  the signals used to burn any disk. A part of this depends on the quality of the disk and the writer. The process of physically burning data to any disk is analogue. Using higher speeds to burn any disk will not introduce errors, what really happens is this:
Every CD burner creates “bumps” on a CD’s surface. These bumps are detected by CD players in order to play. They are affected by the writing speed, disk quality and the laser.Thus it goes without saying that that they must be well defined. Poorly defined bumps result in the CD player extracting jittery signals. Thus the player is unable to decode data properly. The better the quality of a player, the lesser are its chances of making errors.

Final words…

Everywhere I searched, people recommended limiting speeds between 4x-8x. Of course, they also mentioned the quality of the disk and burner must also be noted.
Now matching speeds with the quality of the media is necessary; but we don’t get to figure this out at home unless we have a fully equipped lab. It is thus wiser to burn at lower speeds to be on the safe side. Of course, you might come across those days when there’s a lot of work and you simply cannot wait too long. For those instances use your judgment. Increase the speed if you have to but don't exceed the limit (usually printed on the CD). Instead stay a few notches below it.
If it is a data disk that you are burning, then higher speeds do not affect much as they are better protected (again, don’t cross the limit). Audio disks require you to keep the speeds low, so that you don’t lose out on quality.

No comments:

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